Subfamily FORMICINAE
Tribe PLAGIOLEPIDINI

Brachymyrmex depilis Emery
Brachymyrmex depilis, frontal view of head of a worker (click image to enlarge).
Brachymyrmex depilis, side view of a worker (click image to enlarge).
Brachymyrmex depilis, full face view of a worker (click image to enlarge).
Photo courtesy of http://www.antweb.org/.
Brachymyrmex depilis, side view of a worker
(click image to enlarge).
Photo courtesy of http://www.antweb.org/.
Brachymyrmex depilis, side view of a female (click image to enlarge).
Photo courtesy of http://www.antweb.org/.

Introduction
Brachymyrmex is a New World genus whose members are minute, soft-bodied, have a small petiolar scale, and a nine segmented antenna without a club. Workers have well developed eyes. Color ranges from pale light-yellow to dark brown. Species is this genus usually nest in soil or rotting wood. This group is in drastic need of revision.

Identification
Brachymyrmex depilis is a small yellow species that lacks erect hairs on the body and limited pubescense. The head is wider than long. The eyes are relatively large for such a small species with 16 to 20 facets, and 6-or more in greatest diameter. The scape barely surpasses the occipital border. Metanotal sutures are reduced or not obvious.

Brachymyrmex depilis is distinguished from other species in the group in this region by its lack of erect hairs (only a few on the edges of the gastral tergites) and relatively large eye. An undescribed species known only from FL is similar in that it lacks erect hairs, but the eye is much smaller with only 3-4 facets in the greatest diameter of the eye. Other yellow species known from the U.S., including a new species that has been collected from southern AL and MS, differ in that they have semi-erect hairs present on the promesonotum. Other species of Brachymyrmex known from this region are dark brown.

Biology and Economic Importance
This species is common in the Southeast in certain forested habitats, especially mixed forests with at least some terrain. However, it appears to be lacking in flatwoods areas, Black Belt Prairie remnants, and fields. Alates have been collected in mid to late June.

Distribution

Literature Cited

Links
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